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Etymology of the English word continue

the English word continue
derived from the Old French word continuer
derived from the Medieval Latin word continuare (adjourn; bridge; extend, prolong; make continuous; put in line)
derived from the Medieval Latin word continuus (attendant, one who is always around; continuous, connected, hanging together; incessant, unremitting, constantly repeated)
derived from the Latin word continere (hinder, contain, shut in; keep, hold, hang together; secure, maintain, sustain)
using the Latin prefix con- (together)
derived from the Latin prefix com-
derived from the Latin word cum (with)
derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *kom (near, with, together)
derived from the Medieval Latin word tenere (hold, keep; comprehend; represent; support)
derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *ten-
derived from the French word continue
derived from the Medieval Latin word continuare (adjourn; bridge; extend, prolong; make continuous; put in line)
derived from the Medieval Latin word continuus (attendant, one who is always around; continuous, connected, hanging together; incessant, unremitting, constantly repeated)
derived from the Latin word continere (hinder, contain, shut in; keep, hold, hang together; secure, maintain, sustain)
using the Latin prefix con- (together)
derived from the Latin prefix com-
derived from the Latin word cum (with)
derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *kom (near, with, together)
derived from the Medieval Latin word tenere (hold, keep; comprehend; represent; support)
derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *ten-

Date

The earliest known usage of continue in English dates from the 14th century.

Derivations in English

continued, continuing

Cognates

French continuer, Italian continuare, Spanish continuar

Usage

Word found in Modern English



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